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Vendor: Microsoft
Exam Code: 70-341
Exam Name: Microsoft Core Solutions of Microsoft Exchange Server 2013

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QUESTION 81
Your company has offices in Miami, Singapore and Montreal.
An Active Directory site exists for each office.
You have an Exchange Server 2013 organization that contains a server in each site.
Each server has the Mailbox server role and the Client Access Server role installed.
All users connect to the Miami servers to retrieve the public folder hierarchy.
You need to create several public folders on the server in the Singapore office to meet the following requirements:
– Ensure that the public folders are available if a single Mailbox server fails.
– Ensure that the users in the Singapore office connect to their local server to retrieve the public folder hierarchy.
Which actions should you perform? (Each correct answer presents part of the solution. Choose all that apply.)

A.    Create a new public folder mailbox.
B.    Create a new public folder database.
C.    Run the Add-MailboxDatabaseCopy cmdlet.
D.    For each mailbox in the Singapore office, run the Set-Mailbox cmdlet and specify the
-defaultpublicfoldermailbox parameter.
E.    Run the Set-PublicFolderDatabase cmdlet.
F.    For each public folder mailbox, run the Set-Mailbox cmdlet and specify the
-defaultpublicfoldermailbox parameter.

Answer: ACD
Explanation:
Public Folders
Public folders can also be used as an archiving method for distribution groups. When you mail- enable a public folder and add it as a member of the distribution group, email sent to the group is automatically added to the public folder for later reference.
Public folders are designed for shared access and provide an easy and effective way to collect, organize, and share information with other people in your workgroup or organization.
Public folders help organize content in a deep hierarchy that’s easy to browse. Users will see the full hierarchy in Outlook, which makes it easy for them to browse for the content they’re interested in.
Public folder architecture
In Exchange 2013, public folders were re-engineered using mailbox infrastructure to take advantage of the existing high availability and storage technologies of the mailbox database. Public folder architecture uses specially designed mailboxes to store both the public folder hierarchy and the content. This also means that there’s no longer a public folder database. High availability for the public folder mailboxes is provided by a database availability group (DAG).
NOT B
In Exchange 2013, public folders were re-engineered using mailbox infrastructure to take advantage of the existing high availability and storage technologies of the mailbox database.
Public folder architecture uses specially designed mailboxes to store both the public folder hierarchy and the content. This also means that there’s no longer a public folder database
There is no database-level setting in Exchange 2013. Exchange 2013 has a mailbox-level ability to specify the public folder mailbox, but by default Exchange auto-calculates the per-user hierarchy mailbox.
NOT E
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa997225(v=exchg.141).aspx
Use the Set-PublicFolderDatabase cmdlet to set attributes of public folder databases (Exchange Server 2010)
There’s no longer a public folder database in Exchange Server 2013.
There is no database-level setting in Exchange 2013. Exchange 2013 has a mailbox-level ability to specify the public folder mailbox, but by default Exchange auto-calculates the per-user hierarchy mailbox.
NOT F
Need to set it in the Singapore Office.
Miami users still use the Miami servers to connect to the public folder hiearchy.
A
Need to create a public folder mailbox in the Singapore office.
Public folder architecture uses specially designed mailboxes to store both the public folder hierarchy and the content. This also means that there’s no longer a public folder database
C
Use the Add-MailboxDatabaseCopy cmdlet to create a passive copy of an existing active mailbox database.
The specified Mailbox server must be in the same database availability group (DAG), and the DAG must have quorum and be healthy.
D
Use the Set-MailboxServer cmdlet to modify attributes on a computer running Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 with the Mailbox server role installed.
In Exchange 2007 and Exchange 2010, you could specify which users had access to specific public folders. In Exchange 2013, you can set the default public folder mailbox per user.
To do so, run the Set-Mailbox cmdlet with the DefaultPublicFolderMailbox parameter.
This ensures that the users in the Singapore office connect to their local server to retrieve the public folder hierarchy.

QUESTION 82
Drag and Drop Question
Your company plans to deploy an Exchange Server 2013 organization.
The network contains an Active Directory forest.
The forest contains two domains named contoso.com and child.contoso.com.
The forest contains one Active Directory site.
To contoso.com, you plan to deploy two servers that have Exchange Server 2013 installed.
To child.contoso.com, you plan to deploy two servers that have Exchange Server 2013 installed. To the contoso.com domain, you deploy a new member server named Server1 that runs Windows Server 2012.
You need to prepare the forest for the planned deployment of Exchange Server 2013.
Which three commands should you run from Server1? To answer, move the three appropriate commands from the list of commands to the answer area and arrange them in the correct order.
 
Answer: 
 

QUESTION 83
You have an Exchange Server 2013 organization.
You need to ensure that an administrator named Admin1 receives a daily email message that contains a log of all the Exchange Server administrative actions.
Which cmdlet should you use in a scheduled task?

A.    Set-AdminAuditLogConfig
B.    Write-AdminAuditLog
C.    New-AdminAuditLogSearch
D.    Search-AdminAuditLog

Answer: C
Explanation:
New-AdminAuditLogSearch: Exchange 2013 Help

QUESTION 84
Drag and Drop Question
Your network contains four servers.
The servers are configured as shown in the following table.
 
You create a new user account for a temporary user named User1.
You plan to create a new mailbox for User1.
You need to recommend which actions must be performed to ensure that User1 can modify only the values of his home phone number attribute and his office location attribute.
In which order should you perform the actions? To answer, move all actions from the list of actions to the answer area and arrange them in the correct order.
 
Answer: 
 

QUESTION 85
Drag and Drop Question
You have an Exchange Server 2013 organization that contains several custom RBAC management roles.
You need to identify which RBAC scopes must be used to meet the following requirements:
– Manage only the mailboxes of the users in the sales department.
– Manage the properties of all the mailbox databases.
Which RBAC scopes should you identify? (To answer, drag the appropriate RBAC scopes to the correct requirements. Each RBAC scope may be used once, more than once, or not at all. You may need to drag the split bar between panes or scroll to view content.)
 
Answer: 
 
Explanation:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd335146(v=exchg.150).aspx
Management role scopes enable you to define the specific scope of impact or influence of a management role when a management role assignment is created. When you apply a scope, the role assignee assigned to the role can only modify the objects contained within that scope.
A role assignee can be a management role group, management role, management role assignment policy, user, or universal security group (USG)
Every management role, whether it’s a built-in role or a custom role, has management scopes.
Management scopes can be either of the following:
Regular
A regular scope isn’t exclusive. It determines where, in Active Directory, objects can be viewed or modified by users assigned the management role. In general, a management role indicates what you can create or modify, and a management role scope indicates where you can create or modify. Regular scopes can be either implicit or explicit scopes, both of which are discussed later in this topic.
Exclusive
An exclusive scope behaves almost the same as a regular scope. The key difference is that it enables you to deny users access to objects contained within the exclusive scope if those users aren’t assigned a role associated with the exclusive scope. All exclusive scopes are explicit scopes, which are discussed later in this topic.
Scopes can be inherited from the management role, specified as a predefined relative scope on a management role assignment, or created using custom filters and added to a management role assignment.
Scopes inherited from management roles are called implicit scopes while predefined and custom scopes are called explicit scopes.
Implicit scopes are the default scopes that apply to a management role type. Because implicit scopes are associated with a management role type, all of the parent and child management roles with the same role type also have the same implicit scopes.
Implicit scopes apply to both built-in management roles and also to custom management roles.
Implicit scopes defined on management roles
Implicit scopes Description
Organization If Organization is present in the role’s recipient write scope, the role can create or modify recipient objects across the Exchange organization.
If Organization is present in the role’s recipient read scope, roles can view any recipient object across the Exchange organization.
This scope is used only with recipient read and write scopes. MyGAL If MyGAL is present in the role’s recipient write scope, the role can view the properties of any recipient within the current user’s global address list (GAL). If MyGAL is present in the role’s recipient read scope, the role can view the properties of any recipient within the current GAL.
This scope is used only with recipient read scopes.
Self If Self is present in the role’s recipient write scope, the role can modify only the properties of the current user’s mailbox.
If Self is present in the role’s recipient read scope, the role can view only the properties of the current user’s mailbox.
This scope is used only with recipient read and write scopes.
MyDistributionGroups
If MyDistributionGroups is present in the role’s recipient write scope, the role can create or modify distribution list objects owned by the current user. If MyDistributionGroups is present in the role’s recipient read scope, the role can view distribution list objects owned by the current user.
This scope is used only with recipient read and write scopes. OrganizationConfig
If OrganizationConfig is present in the role’s configuration write scope, the role can create or modify any server or database configuration object across the Exchange organization.
If OrganizationConfig is present in the role’s configuration read scope, the role can view any server or database configuration object across the Exchange organization. This scope is used only with configuration read and write scopes. None If None is in a scope, that scope isn’t available to the role. For example, a role that has None in the recipient write scope can’t modify recipient objects in the Exchange organization. Explicit scopes are scopes that you set yourself to control which objects a management role can modify. Although implicit scopes are defined on a management role, explicit scopes are defined on a management role assignment.
This enables the implicit scopes to be applied consistently across all management roles unless you choose to use an overriding explicit scope. For more information about management role assignments, see Understanding Management Role Assignments. Explicit scopes override the implicit write and configuration scopes of a management role. They don’t override the implicit read scope of a management role. The implicit read scope continues to define what objects the management role can read.
Explicit scopes are useful when the implicit write scope of a management role doesn’t meet the needs of your business. You can add an explicit scope to include nearly anything you want as long as the new scope doesn’t exceed the bounds of the implicit read scope. The cmdlets that are part of a management role must be able to read information about the objects or containers that contain objects for the cmdlets to create or modify objects. For example, if the implicit read scope on a management role is set to Self, you can’t add an explicit write scope of Organization because the explicit write scope exceeds the bounds of the implicit read scope.
The OrganizationConfig implicit scope
If OrganizationConfig is present in the role’s configuration write scope, the role can create or modify any server or database configuration object across the Exchange organization.
If OrganizationConfig is present in the role’s configuration read scope, the role can view any server or database configuration object across the Exchange organization.
CAN MANAGE THE PROPERTIES OF ALL OF THE MAILBOX DATABASES. The Self Implicit Scope If Self is present in the role’s recipient write scope, the role can modify only the properties of the current user’s mailbox.
If Self is present in the role’s recipient read scope, the role can view only the properties of the current user’s mailbox.
CANNOT BE SELF AS IT PERTAINS TO ONLY THE PARTICULAR USER’S MAILBOX
The Organization relative scope
If Organization is present in the role’s recipient write scope, the role can create or modify recipient objects across the Exchange organization.
If Organization is present in the role’s recipient read scope, roles can view any recipient object across the Exchange organization.
This scope is used only with recipient read and write scopes.
NOT MEANT FOR MANAGING MAILBOX DATABASES
A recipient is any mail-enabled object in the Active Directory directory service to which Exchange can deliver or route messages.
In Microsoft Exchange recipients are comprised of mailbox users, mail-enabled users, mail contacts, distribution groups, security groups, dynamic distribution groups, and mail-enabled public folders.
The Recipient filter explicit scope
Recipient filter scopes use filters to target specific recipients based on recipient type or other recipient properties such as department, manager, location, and more.
CAN TARGET THE USERS IN THE SALES DEPARTMENT

QUESTION 86
Drag and Drop Question
You have an Exchange Server 2007 organization.
You are migrating the organization to Exchange Server 2013.
The migration will last eight weeks. All servers are in a site named Site1.
The servers in the organization are configured as shown in the following table.
Users who have mailboxes on all of the servers will access Outlook Anywhere by using the mail.adatum.com name.
You need to recommend which servers must be associated to the autodiscover.adatum.com and mail.adatum.com names.
Which servers should you identify for each name? (To answer, drag the appropriate servers to the correct names. Each server may be used once, more than once, or not at all. You may need to drag the split bar between panes or scroll to view content.)
 
Answer: 
 
Explanation:
INCOMPLETE INFORMATION
MAKES IT TOO DIFFICULT TO EVEN GUESS HOW TO ARRIVE AT THE CORRECT ANSWER MAY DEPEND ON THE TYPE OF SERVER (MAILBOX OR CLIENT ACCESS SERVER THAT IS IN USE OR THE VERSION OF OUTLOOK BEING USED
TO DETERMINE IF AUTODISCOVER CAN BE UTILISED ON THAT PARTICULAR SERVER. WHEN CAN YOU USE AUTODISCOVER WHEN CAN YOU NOT USE AUTODISCOVER Autodiscover
Exchange Autodiscover is a service which is run on Exchange Client Access Servers. It is one of the new features it included in exchange 2007+ The Autodiscover service makes it easier to configure Outlook 2007 ,Outlook 2010 + and some mobile phones.
Autodiscover Service cannot be used with earlier versions of Outlook, including Outlook 2003. In earlier versions of Microsoft Exchange (Exchange 2003 SP2 or earlier) and Outlook (Outlook 2003 or earlier), you had to configure all user profiles manually to access Exchange. The Autodiscover service uses a user’s e-mail address and password to automatically configure a user’s profile. Using the e-mail address, the Autodiscover service provides the following information to the client:
The user’s display name.
Separate connection settings for internal and external connectivity.
The location of the user’s Mailbox server.
The URLs for various Outlook features that manage functionality such as OOF, free/busy information, Unified Messaging, and the offline address book.
Outlook Anywhere server settings.
Additionally, a new Active Directory object named the service connection point (SCP) is created on the server where you install the Client Access server role. And Autodiscover information is stored in it.
Exchange 2013 requires its Outlook clients support auto-discovery of the server; this is in part to help streamline cloud deployments of Exchange. Clients also have to support "Outlook Anywhere" access–remote procedure calls via HTTP–to connect to Exchange 2013 instead of using TCP-based RPCs as in older versions of Exchange.
What actually happens after you have entered your details is that the client looks for autodiscover.yourdomain.com and attempts to retrieve the rest of the server configuration details from there.

QUESTION 87
You have an Exchange Server 2013 organization.
All user mailboxes have an In-Place Archive enabled.
You need to identify which email message types can be archived by using a retention policy. Which message type or types should you identify? (Each correct answer presents part of the solution. Choose all that apply.)

A.    calendar items
B.    mail items
C.    note items
D.    task items
E.    contact items

Answer: BCE

QUESTION 88
Your company, Fabrikam Inc., has an Exchange Server 2013 organization.
The organization that contains three servers named Server1, Server2, and Server3.
Server1 and Server2 are members of a database availability group (DAG) named DAG1.
DAG1 contains two mailbox databases.
All databases are active on Server1 and replicate to Server2.
You start an unplanned maintenance on Server1 and shut down Server1.
You discover that the databases do not mount on Server2.
You restart Server1 and the databases mount automatically on Server1.
You need to identify what prevents the databases from switching over successfully to Server2. Which cmdlet should you run?

A.    Test-ReplicationHealth
B.    Test-OutlookConnectivity
C.    Test-ServiceHealth
D.    Get-AvailabilityReportOutage

Answer: A
Explanation:
The cmdlet is designed for the proactive monitoring of continuous replication and the continuous replication pipeline, the availability of Active Manager, and the health and status of the underlying cluster service, quorum, and network components. The Test-ReplicationHealth cmdlet can be run locally or remotely against any Mailbox server in a DAG.
NOT B
Test-OutlookConnectivity
Use the Test-OutlookConnectivity cmdlet to test end-to-end Microsoft Outlook client connectivity in the Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 organization. This includes testing for Outlook Anywhere (RPC/HTTP) connections.
EXAMPLE 1
This example runs a protocol test from the Mailbox server.
Test-OutlookConnectivity -ProbeIdentity "OutlookSelfTestProbe"
NOT C
Use the Test-ServiceHealth cmdlet to test whether all the Microsoft Windows services that Exchange requires on a server have started.
The Test-ServiceHealth cmdlet returns an error for any service required by a configured role when the service is set to start automatically and isn’t currently running.
EXAMPLE 1
This example uses the Test-ServiceHealth command without parameters to test the services on the local server.
Test-ServiceHealth
NOT D
Use the Get-AvailabilityReportOutage cmdlet to return the daily downtime (if any) for each service entity and its overridden value (if set) to the overall reported availability for the day.
For information about the parameter sets in the Syntax section below, see Syntax.
This example returns all outages that occurred the previous day.
This cmdlet always returns outages for one day.
Get-AvailabilityReportOutage

QUESTION 89
You have an Exchange Server 2010 organization named adatum.com.
You deploy a server that has Exchange Server 2013 installed.
You plan to install eight additional servers that have Exchange Server 2013 installed.
You are a member of the Organization Management management role group.
You hire a temporary Exchange administrator named Temp1.
The company’s security policy states that all external consultants must have the minimum number of required permissions on the network.
You need to ensure that Temp1 can install a server named Server5.
The solution must meet the requirements of the security policy.
Which two tasks should you perform? (Each correct answer presents part of the solution. Choose two.)

A.    Run setup and specify the /newprovisionedserver:Server5 parameter.
B.    Add Temp1 to the Delegated Setup management role group.
C.    Add Temp1 to the Exchange Server role group.
D.    Create a new management role and a new role assignment policy.
E.    Run setup and specify the /roles:temp1 parameter

Answer: AB
Explanation:
NOT C
Unable to install a server given this management role
The Exchange Servers management role enables administrators to do the following on individual servers:
Add and remove database availability groups and configure database copies
Enable, disable and configure Unified Messaging services
Modify transport configuration on Mailbox and Client Access servers
Enable and disable Microsoft Outlook Anywhere on Client Access servers
Modify Mailbox and Client Access server configuration
Modify Outlook Anywhere configuration on Client Access servers
Modify content filtering configuration on Mailbox servers
Modify general Exchange server configuration
Modify server monitoring configuration
View the configuration for each server role
This management role is one of several built-in roles in the Role Based Access Control (RBAC) permissions model in Microsoft Exchange Server 2013. Management roles, which are assigned to one or more management role groups, management role assignment policies, users, or universal security groups (USG), act as a logical grouping of cmdlets or scripts that are combined to provide access to view or modify the configuration of Exchange 2013 components, such as mailbox databases, transport rules, and recipients. If a cmdlet or script and its parameters, together called a management role entry, are included on a role, that cmdlet or script and its parameters can be run by those assigned the role. For more information about management roles and management role entries, see Understanding Management Roles.
NOT D
No need to create a new management role
NOT E
Need to use the /NewProvisionedServer parameter setup /roles command is OK for exchange 2007
With temp1 appears to be an invalid command and not applicable to exchange 2013
A
To delegate setup, you must first run Setup.com from a Command Prompt window with the /
NewProvisionedServer parameter.
This will not install Exchange on the server, but instead will create a placeholder object for the server in Active Directory and will add the machine account for this server to the Exchange Servers group.
B
Need to Add Temp1 to the Delegated Setup management role group.
Delegated Setup management role group
The Delegated Setup management role group is one of several built-in role groups that make up the Role Based Access Control (RBAC) permissions model in Microsoft Exchange Server 2013.
Role groups are assigned one or more management roles that contain the permissions required to perform a given set of tasks. The members of a role group are granted access to the management roles assigned to the role group. For more information about role groups, see Understanding Management Role Groups.
Administrators who are members of the Delegated Setup role group can deploy servers running Exchange 2013 that have been previously provisioned by a member of the Organization Management role group.
Members of the Delegated Setup role group can only deploy Exchange 2013 servers.
They can’t manage the server after it’s been deployed.
To manage a server after it’s been deployed, a user must be a member of the Server Management role group.
For more information about RBAC, see Understanding Role Based Access Control.

QUESTION 90
You have an Exchange Server 2013 organization that contains two Client Access servers named
EX1 and EX2 and two Mailbox servers named EX3 and EX4.
You have a firewall that controls all of the traffic between the internal network and the Internet. EX3 and EX4 are prevented from communicating with Internet hosts.
EX1 and EX3 are in a site named Site1.
EX2 and EX4 are in a site named Site2.
All outbound email is sent through EX1. Site1 fails.
You discover that email messages for the Internet are queued on EX4.
You create a new send connector in Site2.
You discover that all of the outbound email is queued on EX4 and is not delivered to the Internet. You verify that the client computers on the network can receive email messages from the Internet successfully.
You need to ensure that the email messages are delivered successfully to the Internet.
Which cmdlet should you run?

A.    Set-SendConnector
B.    Set-MailboxTransportService
C.    Set-TransportService
D.    Set-TransportServer

Answer: A


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